EQ Training

Behavioral EQ Includes Two Components

1.  Emotional Intelligence

  • Perceiving and understanding one’s own emotions and the emotions of others
  • Gaining insight into oneself
  • Exercising empathy for others’ experiences

2.  Behavioral Intelligence

  • Recognizing the impact that emotions have on one’s own behavior and the behavior of others
  • Using this awareness to manage personal behavior and relationships

To fully understand the differences, consider that Emotional Intelligence is completely internal; it is a person’s ability to understand his own emotions and recognize the emotions of others. Therefore Emotional Intelligence can be thought of as preceding Behavioral Intelligence. It might be helpful to practice Emotional Intelligence, but it is difficult to observe and put into action. Further, Behavioral Intelligence has proven to generate visible increases in productivity, team cohesion, employee engagement, leadership performance and the ability to effectively navigate change.


The Model Consists of 4 Dimensions and 15 Core Competencies

The Components

Emotional Intelligence — Self

  • Emotion Awareness – awareness of one’s own emotions and their impact on outward behavior.
  • Self-insight – the accuracy of one’s awareness of personal strengths and limitations. Includes openness to feedback and self-development
  • Self-confidence – feelings of self-worth and personal competence. An indicator of confidence and the ability to convey this confidence to other

Behavioral Intelligence — Self

  • Self-control – the ability to control emotions and impulsive urges. It is an indicator of ability to stay composed and focused
  • Stress Management – the ability to withstand pressure and regulate reactions to stress
  • Conscientiousness – the capacity to take personal responsibility for performance
  • Optimism – the ability to maintain a positive perspective and achieve goals even in difficult circumstances

Emotional Intelligence — Others

  • Emotion Perception – the ability to perceive and understand emotions others are expressing
  • Empathy/Openness – the ability to consider someone else’s perspective and display openness to others’ viewpoints
  • Listening – the ability to actively listen and display an understanding of communications

Behavioral Intelligence — Others

  • Building Relationships – the ability to develop and maintain meaningful and positive relations with others
  • Influencing Others – the ability to persuade others
  • Motivating Others – the ability to motivate and guide others toward a vision or goal
  • Flexibility – the ability to adapt to new circumstances and changing priorities
  • Innovativeness – the capacity to generate novel ideas and be open to new information.

Offerings

Behavioral EQ Self-Perception Profile

The  Behavioral EQ® Self-Perception Profile uses a self-completed online questionnaire to measure a person’s own view of their Emotional Intelligence.  An electronic profile is generated that explains the results and provides guidance about effectively applying Behavioral EQ.  The Behavioral EQ Concepts Guide is included with the profile.  The Concepts Guide allows an individual understand the fundamentals of emotional intelligence, measure their own abilities and improve their performance.  Participants will learn to recognize the meaning and importance of Behavioral EQ.  In addition, they can recognize that everyone can improve their Behavioral EQ skills and begin to create an action plan focused on developing these skills.  

Behavioral EQ Course

Developing Behavioral EQ is a  course which provides an in-depth review of elements of Emotional Intelligence and strategies to improve performance. Participants receive detailed lessons and exercises to apply Emotional Intelligence in workplace situations.

We teach a 3rd generation of Emotional Intelligence that emphasizes behavior and is more appropriately known as Behavioral EQ. To fully understand the differences, consider that Emotional Intelligence is completely internal – it is a person’s ability to understand his own emotions and recognize the emotions of others. Therefore Emotional Intelligence can be thought of as preceding Behavioral Intelligence. It might be helpful to practice Emotional Intelligence, but it is difficult to observe.


The second main point is that Behavioral Intelligence is what people see, hear and respond to. The research clearly shows that behavior is the best predictor of effectiveness. While it’s good and maybe even necessary to have emotional awareness, unless this awareness is translated into behavior it is somewhat meaningless. For example, a manager may be aware that someone on his team is struggling with the workload and also needs some development, but if the manager doesn’t do anything with this awareness and lets the employee languish without taking steps to help him, then the awareness doesn’t do either any good.

Even people with high EQ, in the pure sense of having good emotional awareness and recognition, will not by default be more effective in their behaviors. And behavior is what matters. It is what people notice and respond to. Someone can’t see inside anotherperson’s head to know what they are experiencing, one can only rely on what people say and do.


Learn more about TRACOM’s emotional intelligence training.

Outcomes

  • In today’s economy, organizations are looking for ways to improve their productivity with Emotional Intelligence. 
  • Behavioral EQ has emerged as the proven way to quickly improve the performance of individuals and their organizations.
  • Behavioral EQ skills are objective, with measurable benefits associated with increased sales, better recruiting, effective leadership and high customer service.
  • Further, there is evidence that Behavioral EQ skills can be developed through training programs. Developing these skills makes individuals and their organizations more productive and e ective.

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